Presentations

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I’m doing my first solo presentation on centers this weekend at the Simmons GSLIS conference!

Library Center Presentation

 

I’m very excited to share my experience using library centers with future library teachers but I’m also nervous because I’ve only ever presented at AASL with Cari and Carolyn and that was during IDEAxCHANGE so it wasn’t a formal presentation.  Hopefully it will go well!

What would you like to see or learn if you were at a presentation on centers?

2 Responses to “Presentations”

  1. Kate Tamms

    If students choose their desired centers, how do you make sure they all have an opportunity to visit all of them? And how do you still make time for teaching full-class library lessons?

    • mrslodge

      I don’t make sure they try each center. If that’s important to you, you could rotate groups of students through centers each week. I have seen a few teachers do that. I like that students are in charge of their learning during center time. I think they’re more engaged when they are making the choice themselves. It doesn’t bother me at all if someone reads pop up books 5 weeks in a row and then plays Boggle one time and then goes back to pop up books.

      My classes are 30 minutes. The first 15-20 minutes are a formal library lesson addressing our district’s library curriculum or supporting classroom research. The time remaining after the lesson is book checkout and centers time. Students choose a center after they check out or if they’re not checking out for some reason (came during free check out in the morning, are reading something from the public library or classroom, are renewing, etc.). Some kids will do centers for 12 minutes one day and other students will spend the entire time checking out books. Since centers support my teaching, not take the place of it, I don’t keep track of who does what or for how long. I know when I’m helping other students with book selection that other kids are working and learning independently at a center. Centers has greatly reduced off task behaviors and for the most part, during checkout I can focus on assisting with book selection or even work at a center with students.

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